Monday, June 2, 2008

Women on top of Internet

Who uses the Internet most? Women. They took over three or four years ago. And magazines, television and newspapers are falling behind. Here's a sampling of gender-specific sites. Women also control 83 percent of spending in America. Estrogen anyone?



According to Steelcase, one of the largest cubicle manufacturers, nearly 70 percent of office work in the U. S. happens in cubicles. Have you ever worked in one? Cubicles are a rat maze without soul. Thankfully, they are falling out of favor. Even the manufacturers are apologizing. Too late.



Swede researchers say the death rate for golfers is 40 percent lower than for other people of the same sex, age and socioeconomic status. That corresponds to a five year increase in life expectancy. Wouldn’t you know it, golfers with the lowest handicap are the safest. I'm a goner.


More bad news. The electronic book is gaining traction. Ever hear of Kindle, the electronic reader from Amazon? You will. You will. The evil device already accounts for six percent of Amazon’s sales of books that go both ways – electronic or paper.



Six or seven thousand years ago, Neolithic Iranians were the first to ferment wine. Wine snobs were born in the next litter. Car mechanics, next. Both groups use special, pretentious lingo to keep the rest of us in awe. Things like, “You blew a rod.” And, “Are these grapes nebbiolo or temprauillo?” Don’t panic – bluff. Write these down: bright, silky, luscious, robust (for good wines) and putrid, mouldy, horsey (for the bad). Horsey?



A friend sent this niblet:

Here’s a handy website. Almost anything you want to do on the Internet is here. One click and you’re there.

http://www.allmyfaves.com/

4 comments:

Jeff Hebert said...

I reject the use of "horsey" to describe bad wine! Our horses love it:

Horse drinking wine.

Ross said...

A word for electronic books, from a book lover: What if you could lug a backpack full of books in a box weighing less than 2 pounds? Read at night without a light (backlit screen)? Search text for that thing you remember but not quite in full?

As for cubicles, Google "cubical humor" and you'll find a subculture. One sample: http://www.cubiclecoffee.com/diversions/humor.htm

The South Plainsman said...

The ladies, of course, were very effective with their bra-burning 30 and 40 years ago. They not only lead the Internet, but in college degrees and a lot of stuff like that. In Texas, there are more women in law schools than men. And to think, 44 years ago when I graduated from UT Law there was not a single female in the school( or married one either). Maybe the guys should start burning their jock straps.

As for cubicles, that story reminds me of a time back in 1978 when a friend of mine and I were in the DC area to deal with the Bureau of Land Management. We went to a large 6 or 8 story building in Silver Springs that must have covered an entire block. Upon entering, we took an elevator to the required floor. When the door opened, it opened into a room that ran the entire length and width of the building. There were hundreds of desks lined up neatly in rows. No cubicles. None.

The desks were mostly occupied (some were vacant...break time, I suppose)by women...not a man in the place except the two of us. As we talked to the two ladies who appeared to be in charged, I noticed that at least two thirds of the women were either doing their nails, putting on lipstick, or messing with their hair. The rest were visiting across the desks. Darnedest thing I ever saw. There were hundreds of them, all accomplishing exactly nothing. Our government at work. Cubicles would not have helped.

The Kindle may be the forerunner of what we will have in the future. As Ross point out, electronic access makes it a lot more efficient. I wonder what has happened to the Google project to put entire libraries online.

The South Plainsman said...

How could I fail to comment on the subject of Iranian winemakers? My old friend, Omar Khayyam, a Persian of some consequence 10 Centuries ago, had a number of appropriate comments on the subject of Persian wine. From The Rubaiyat (translation by FitzGerald):

A Book of Verses underneath the Bough,
A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread-and Thou
Beside me singing in the Wilderness-
Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!

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